I am a bit confused

Here you can find out about our Folding Team! Our goal: to understand protein folding, protein aggregation, and related diseases
NAiLs
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Postby NAiLs » Thu Sep 02, 2004 11:28 pm

Amy wrote:
I may have to give this one a shot since I haven't been at my PC much recently.


Great! Now you can actually say that your pc is doing something productive instead of sitting and collecting dust :D


LoL... yeah... that's about it. I built my computer back in April (I think) of 2003 and it hasn't gotten a ton of use. I was anticipating a bunch of games to come out, but they never did... yet. I've got a few spare computers laying around too, but those aren't going to get used often. Usually to help me repair peoples computers.

So yeah, I guess I can say my computer is doing something now.

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Amy
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Postby Amy » Fri Sep 03, 2004 6:37 am

So have you downloaded it yet? I don't see your name on our team...

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Postby Amy » Fri Sep 03, 2004 6:45 am

Oh, I was just reading some more on this and discovered something interesting:
It's amazing that not only do proteins self-assemble -- fold -- but they do so amazingly quickly: some as fast as a millionth of a second. While this time is very fast on a person's timescale, it's remarkably long for computers to simulate.

In fact, it takes about a day to simulate a nanosecond (1/1,000,000,000 of a second). Unfortunately, proteins fold on the tens of microsecond timescale (10,000 nanoseconds). Thus, it would take 10,000 CPU days to simulate folding -- i.e. it would take 30 CPU years! That's a long time to wait for one result!



A SOLUTION: DISTRIBUTED DYNAMICS


To solve the protein folding problem, we need to break the microsecond barrier. Our group has developed a new way to simulate protein folding which can break the microsecond barrier by dividing the work between multiple processors in a new way -- with a near linear speed up in the number of processors. Thus, with 1000 processors, we can break the microsecond barrier and help unlock the mystery of how proteins fold.



http://folding.stanford.edu/science.html

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Postby NAiLs » Fri Sep 03, 2004 11:30 am

Amy wrote:So have you downloaded it yet? I don't see your name on our team...
Going to later this afternoon! :D I've been busy the last couple days.


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