Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk (56k Warning!!)

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Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk (56k Warning!!)

Postby ultimatedesk » Wed Dec 29, 2010 11:46 am

Hey all,

I've always wanted to create my own custom computer desk, so I decided several weeks ago to embark on the journey. Stay tuned with me for pictures and descriptions, and feel free to chip in with ideas and criticisms :)

Firstly, I'd like to thank Crucial, Kingston and Danger Den for sponsoring this project and for helping to make it a reality:

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http://www.crucial.com

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http://www.kingston.com

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http://www.dangerden.com

I wanted the desk to be capable of having 2 integrated desktop systems. 1 for high-powered gaming, and the other, a low-powered system with lots of hard-drive space that will be on 24/7 for sharing media across the network and playing videos locally.

It needs to be quiet, have dust control, have manual fan control, and it also needs to look great in an office - sorry ahead of time to all you bling lovers!

I used Google Sketchup for all of my drafts.

I started first by sketching on paper how I would like the components to be laid out, and then started working on the left-hand module.

After determining the minimum width, I started to build up the left-hand module, taking into consideration that I would be using 3/4" plywood for the construction.

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I then decided that the air intake will be on the same board that the motherboard will lie, air will come from the bottom. It will be covered with a furnace air filter material that should eliminate most of the dust, and also provide good air circulation.

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Next up was to add some to-scale components. A big thanks to B@gy, who created the model for the Noctua NH-U12P CPU Heatsink, as well as the Noctua fans, Alexander who created the model for the Asus Ares video card, Nightsoul who created the model of the Western Digital Hard-Drives, and Fubar East for the very nice power supply model. Your talent saved me a lot of time when it came to placing the items to scale.

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Another view, from the back

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I then took the same requirements and applied them to the right-hand module. This will be the "server-type" system. I also wanted to add drawers to this particular module, so this is what I came up with. It has the same air-intake system, which will be covered by a furnace air filter.

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And, finally, putting it all together, I figured 2 monitors is a reasonable thing these days. In the upper left, there will be the DVD drive, plus power and fan controls for the gaming rig. There is a glass cover over the gaming rig that can be removed to perform upgrades and maintenance.

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And a picture of the back - the boxes aren't exactly what they'll turn out as - they are for cable management, ideally I will setup little boxes so you will see almost NO cables in the back. They will have some foam stuffed in the top to keep dust out of the boxes as well.

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And that's it for this post! The 1st draft! I'll have to ponder on it for a little while to make sure everything is A-OK for building, and determine how much lumber I'll need.

As always, comments, feedback and ideas are ALWAYS WELCOME! This is going to be a long build, I figure it'll take me a couple months at least, and that's not including some of the custom electronic trickery I'm going to have to learn
Last edited by ultimatedesk on Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:33 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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The 2nd Draft

Postby ultimatedesk » Wed Dec 29, 2010 11:47 am

After spending some time reviewing my 1st draft I realized a few things very quickly:

1. All my joints are butt joints! This is going to result in a lot of screw holes on the visible surfaces that I will have to cover up, and it will not be as strong as it could be.

2. The edges of plywood are nasty - I did not account for using 1/4" solid wood trim on all of the visible edges of the plywood. This will seriously throw off all my measurements.

3. The right-hand module, with the so called drawers, don't actually have drawers sketched in - just drawer faces!

So, it was time start from scratch (Sorta). Here's the end result, and ultimately, the final plan. The dark coloured wood is the solid trim, and the light coloured wood are 1x1's so that I can screw the panels together from the inside, avoiding any screw holes on the outside. I also added a few dado joints that I believe will be ultra strong with just a generous application of wood glue.

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So, while I was redoing all of this, I figured: this desk is going to be a beast. A big, heavy, super-duty truck kind of beast. This means I will likely be able to keep it for quite some time, and with technology going the way it is....

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Yup, planning for 3 monitors, external fan / dvd / power controls for both of the systems, and going the full 8 foot length for the desk. The dvd / controls will be in the cubby holes you see in the upper left and right-hand sides of the desk.

It'll be able to be disassembled into 4 pieces - the desk surface, the desk shelf, and the left and right modules.

Much better. I think from here I can make my cut sheets and actually get to work!

Yes, I love Google Sketchup, I am not ashamed of it either, it is so incredibly useful and it's so incredibly free.

I've used it for a few years now, mostly for planning aquarium setups and building aquarium stands. Here is the most awesome part of Sketchup - pulling dimensions, and creating your cut sheets (Someone needs to automate this).

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And that's it! 4 Sheets!

Now I have to figure out where I'm going to build this darn thing. I've got a low-ceiling basement with a circular saw, router, and a drill...

I think I might need some new tools... :D:D:D

Stay tuned! I'll be cutting up some wood next!

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Initial Cuts

Postby ultimatedesk » Wed Dec 29, 2010 11:49 am

Purely coincidentally, while talking over the idea with a few pints at the local pub, a good girlfriend of mine piped up stating:

"Oh, didn't you know? My dad has a full wood shop in his backyard, he'd love to help I'm sure!"

By golly.

A meeting was arranged, and poof, we got along great and he's looking forward to a nice big project being started in his shop.

It's a free standing building in his backyard with an attic for wood storage, lots of tools - stationary and portable, and yeah, lots of tools - did I mention that? Table saw, band saw, drill press, planar, horizontal planar, belt sander, jointer, grinders, air compressor, just about everything a guy could ask for.

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So we set about to pick up the initial bits of lumber. 4 Sheets of 3/4" Plywood, 2-sided Maple Veneer - was a steal too, such a good deal that Mike, the owner of the wood shop, picked up a pair of sheets for himself for a future project as well!

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Time to hit up the table saw to do the initial lengthwise cuts

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Thankfully I had a helper - she was eventually covered in sawdust and abandoned me in the shop after the big cuts were done. It still left me with several 8' long sheets to manage on my own, as you can see in the left hand side of the shop in the back.

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So I set about my merry way, and thankfully, did not lose any of my fingers (This time).

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All of the initial cuts were done, except for one particular strip of 8' that needed to be cut into 3 28" lengths - beyond what the table saw was capable of doing. I decided that it was enough for the day.

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Made quite a nice little mess!!

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All in all a good start to a long project

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Stay tuned! Lots of work still to go

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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby smack323 » Wed Dec 29, 2010 12:45 pm

WOW, I love it.. wish I had the motivation/skills to put something like that together.
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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby XstollieX » Wed Dec 29, 2010 6:44 pm

Looks good! Out of curiosity, what is this project going to cost in materials? This sounds like a good idea if I can afford to remodel my office ever

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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby camaroguy1998 » Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:52 am

XstollieX wrote:Looks good! Out of curiosity, what is this project going to cost in materials? This sounds like a good idea if I can afford to remodel my office ever


+1
I'm definitely watching this thread!

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Hole Time

Postby ultimatedesk » Thu Dec 30, 2010 9:55 am

Thanks for the responses, I appreciate the support!

So far the project has cost around $250 CAN. It was around 200 for the 4 sheets of plywood, and I spent about $50 on screws, glue, wood filler, and sandpaper. Don't forget, I didn't have to buy any tools for this project, so that could significantly increase the cost! I will have to buy staining supplies (Another $50) and probably a few more small things to round out the details.

Had time to cut that last 8' sheet into the 28" sections, and cut a hole in the surface portion of the desk. The surface portion, fyi, will be composed of two 8' pieces of 3/4" plywood, so its total thickness will be 1.5" thick.

The upper plywood will have a hole that is .5" wider all around than the board beneath it.

Only had time to do one hole tonight - the lower portion, thankfully, because I made a few small mistakes!

Sorry about the photos folks, I had already uploaded these to imageshack and forgot to resize them, so here are the thumbnails since I don't have the original stock photos on me right now. From now on, they'll be properly sized at 800x600, which I feel is a fair compromise for detail and bandwidth.

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I started off with a carpenters angle, measured off my lines with a pencil and then made a rough cut with a jigsaw. I then clamped a straight-edge lined up with the edges (measured) and ran a router across it to create the smooth finish.

I messed up a bit, going a bit too far with the router on one end, and then not far enough on the other end - I'll have to sand and file to square it off.

Sorry I didn't take too many pictures - the next hole will have more!

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Thankfully the shop is heated, here's one of the heaters - it went down to -8*C that evening!

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Here's the mess for the night!

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And, the hero of the night! Mastercraft Plunge Router!!

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Drawer Work

Postby ultimatedesk » Thu Dec 30, 2010 9:56 am

One of the main things holding me back right now is the fact that I have not selected the motherboard tray, and template for the motherboard input and outputs, as well as PCI slots. This prevents me from cutting the holes accurately in the back of both of the modules, which prevents me from assembling the actual modules.

I have some "spare" desktop chassis lying around, and will be working to find a solution to that soon.

In the meantime, I started working on the drawers for the right-hand module.

I first took them through the table saw again, trimming off the last 16th or two from some of the boards.

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Then went to work sanding all of the pieces down with 150 grit. I will likely go up to a 180 grit before the final stain goes on. I clamped a straight-edge on to the table saw so that it was easier to sand with the grain (Thanks Mike)

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Slowly, but surely, I went through all the pieces for the drawers, except for the faces. Yes, bad things happen when I don't have my sketchup drawings. I start drawing with markers.

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Mike was doing some work in the shop at the same time as me that day, so there was quite the mess.

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I put together my tools of the trade

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And here are the gluing steps I went through

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A few somewhat artistic clamp shots ;)

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Everything looks pretty straight

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Glued and clamped together the largest of the drawers, will likely put some hanging folders in there.

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Then I screwed everything together with #8 1.5" screws, all holes pre-drilled and countersunk. Most of the holes will be covered by the actual drawer sliding mechanisms, but the exposed ones will get some wood putty.

It's funny being in someone else's wood shop - I couldn't find the countersink bit anywhere - I tried looking through all the drill bit boxes (There were several) and nothing, so I had been using a small bit, then switching to the big bit to countersink, and then switching to the screw bit to screw in the holes.

Mike walks in half-way through the holes and you could tell he was rather amused - he goes to the back of the shop, pulls out a box, pulls out a box from the box, and then a small medicine container out from the box in a box - "Geez, didn't I tell ya to just look around? Oh. Wait. I guess this one was sorta hard to find eh?".

At that point, he also points out that there are several drills in the shop - silly me. So one drill with the countersink bit, one drill with the screw bit. It's been very interesting working in a shop dedicated to this type of work - very, very different from working in the basement with just basic hand tools.

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I haven't attached the faces of the drawers yet as I haven't determined how I would like to attach them. I would also like to attach the trim to the outer edges of the faces before attaching them to the drawers, since it'll be much easier to clamp all the faces together at once.

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And that's it for todays update - a bit short, yes, a lot of pictures of clamps, sorry, I got carried away ;)

I'm spending some time in the shop tonight, so hopefully I'll have another update for all of you tomorrow or the day after!

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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby smack323 » Thu Dec 30, 2010 10:57 am

when I built a MAME/Portable Entertainment cabinet http://forums.legitreviews.com/about15340.html I found a old case and tore it a part to mount the PC and components onto. I worked really well. I am sure with all those fancy tools you could even cut it so it doesnt look like a hack job like mine did..
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Everything is looking great so far.. Do you think it would have been easier to stain everything before putting it together?
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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby Neptune24 » Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:19 am

In thoery it looks very very good and I like the idea that it is built for two systems and that it has the cable tidies built into the unit, very nice indeed.

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2nd Desktop Hole

Postby ultimatedesk » Wed Jan 05, 2011 4:47 pm

smack323 wrote:when I built a MAME/Portable Entertainment cabinet http://forums.legitreviews.com/about15340.html I found a old case and tore it a part to mount the PC and components onto. I worked really well. I am sure with all those fancy tools you could even cut it so it doesnt look like a hack job like mine did..
Everything is looking great so far.. Do you think it would have been easier to stain everything before putting it together?

Really cool project there smack323 - I don't know if I'll be able to do much better of a job no matter the tools - that aluminum/steel is so thin it's hard to cut nice and cleanly I find. I'm not sure if I'll stain before or after - both have their advantages. Before - you can get into all the corners, after - you get more even colour because all the trim pieces are attached...

Neptune24 wrote:In thoery it looks very very good and I like the idea that it is built for two systems and that it has the cable tidies built into the unit, very nice indeed.
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Thanks Neptune24 :)

I finally got around to putting the second hole in the desk surface area (Since the desk is composed of two sheets of plywood, there are two holes needed, with the "top surface" needing a hole that is .5" larger all the way around, so the "bottom surface" supports the piece of glass which covers the gaming computer).

I took a few more detailed pictures compared to last time.

As with before, I started by cutting out a rough shape with the jigsaw. I was able to get within .5" comfortably of my marked lines. Sometimes if you rush the jigsaw, your cuts can get a little squirrely, so I was playing it safe. This is the top surface, so no screwing up here!!

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I then took an extra dose of patience, and went in straight to the corners with the jigsaw. This is a step I did not take last time, and I made a mistake with the router because of this.

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I then took the router and pressed the bit right into the corner, and clamped a straight-edge on behind it. This is how I set the distance from the bit to the straight-edge. I repeated the same for the other side.

All it took was a good solid pass from right-to-left and I had a very clean straight edge without having to go all the way into the corners, where mistakes can be made, since it is quite difficult to see where the actual router bit is when the tool is running.

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Unclamp, reset router, reset clamps and straight edge, lather, rinse, and repeat:

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This hole had a very small margin of error overall, and I am very pleased with the result. The jigsaw is an incredible versatile tool and can be very accurate, as long as you have patience. This one corner is the only one that will need a touch-up with a file and/or sandpaper, and you can see, it's only going to need less than a 16th of material removal!

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And that's all I had time for in the shop that day ;) Enjoy some of my mess!

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Until next time - I have some images in the queue, but I haven't quite gotten around to resizing them just yet ;)

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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby skier » Wed Jan 05, 2011 10:46 pm

The jigsaw is an incredibly versatile tool and can be very accurate, as long as you have patience.


very true, I use a jigsaw for just about everything (have an older Dewalt), even when I should use a skill saw lol

also if you want to see a real mess try using a router on 5/8 MDF Fibreboard! you'd have to vacuum the walls LOL
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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby ultimatedesk » Thu Jan 06, 2011 4:22 pm

skier wrote:
The jigsaw is an incredibly versatile tool and can be very accurate, as long as you have patience.


very true, I use a jigsaw for just about everything (have an older Dewalt), even when I should use a skill saw lol

also if you want to see a real mess try using a router on 5/8 MDF Fibreboard! you'd have to vacuum the walls LOL

lmao, I'm just picturing the mdf mess your describing - that would be one PITA! Don't forget to wear a mask, geez, that stuff's not good for the lungs from what I recall ;)

Got a small update for everyone... Here are a few snapshots. As some of you might know, I've been a little held back in the project due to not having selected my motherboard I/O plates and motherboard trays. Without having the actual items, I couldn't make the appropriate measurements to make cut-outs in the back of the cabinets, and therefore, was unable to make the dado cuts due to worry about everything not fitting properly.

So I scrounged through some old desktop systems I had lying around, emptied their components into my bins, and decided to take apart their chassis in search of some good motherboard tray and I/O parts.

So - off to the spooky basement with a pair of chassis, my trusty drill and dremel.

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Having never drilled rivets out of a case before, I wasn't entirely sure what to expect. At first, I started with a bit that was a little bit small, so the rivets came up onto the drill bit itself and got stuck on there pretty good. Eventually, I moved to a bigger bit, and all it took was one good squeeze of the trigger and the rivet would come right out nice and cleanly.

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Starting to rack up some parts here

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You can see in the image above that the I/O and PCI Plate is built right into the back of the desktop chassis - this is unfortunate, as you'll see in some future photos, my other case actually had a modular I/O plate. I'll have to take the dremel to that part to get what I need.

Time to grab the pliers...

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Here is the shot of the back plate of the other desktop chassis - see how the I/O plate was actually riveted in, and not pressed as a whole back sheet like the other one? Soo much easier to deal with.

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That was a pretty fun experience taking apart the cases. I've got a bunch of scrap sheet metal now too - wonder what interesting projects I can come up with to use them...

On to that first I/O plate - I need to dremel out the section that I need

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Huh.. that actually didn't work out too well, at least, not the way I would like. I'm going to take these parts to the shop to see if there are any better tools for getting nice clean lines.

Until next time!

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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby rat6fink » Thu Jan 06, 2011 8:21 pm

AWESOME work so far!!! 2 things about the Dremel and rivet conundrum: 1) Try a Uni-Bit (also called a step drill). It looks like a cone with increasing diameters, and each step is chamfered, so it leaves a clean edge, with no rivets climbing up your drill. VERY useful!!! They're a bit on the pricey side, compared to a regular drill bit, but they will last quite a while. 2) If you want the clean lines, and the Dremel is your only option, lay out what ya want to cut, and use your cutoff wheel, but don't cut all the way up to the line. Leave some stock, and use your grinding wheel attachment, and grind to finish. If you use this method, remember to leave extra in the corners to account for the grinding wheel radius.
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Desktop Chop Shop Part 2

Postby ultimatedesk » Fri Jan 07, 2011 11:33 am

rat6fink wrote:AWESOME work so far!!! 2 things about the Dremel and rivet conundrum: 1) Try a Uni-Bit (also called a step drill). It looks like a cone with increasing diameters, and each step is chamfered, so it leaves a clean edge, with no rivets climbing up your drill. VERY useful!!! They're a bit on the pricey side, compared to a regular drill bit, but they will last quite a while. 2) If you want the clean lines, and the Dremel is your only option, lay out what ya want to cut, and use your cutoff wheel, but don't cut all the way up to the line. Leave some stock, and use your grinding wheel attachment, and grind to finish. If you use this method, remember to leave extra in the corners to account for the grinding wheel radius.

Hmm, I never thought to use a step bit for the rivets - that's a really great idea! As far as making straight lines with the Dremel - I'm afraid it's just not my speciality... as you'll see below... Thanks for the encouragement ;)

I had some time to take those motherboard tray and I/O Plates to the shop to try out a few tools / techniques for shaping them into something I actually like.

First off, yes, Mike and I tried using the nice Dewalt Jigsaw, but the Mastercraft metal blades we were trying to use just wouldn't stay in the darn clamp. It would cut like butter for maybe 10 seconds and then bam, the blade would fall out of the bottom of the jigsaw onto the ground. Not sure what was going on there.

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Next up, we tried this neat little Mastercraft oscillating tool with a metal blade as well, but no such luck. Couldn't figure out a good way to clamp down the metal tray, so it just vibrated it like crazy instead of actually cutting.

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Our next contestant was an air compressor powered cutting wheel, which, was ultimately less accurate than the dremel, and just as slow.

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So we took out the big gun, the sawzall.

Ha, no, just kidding. It wouldn't work even a tiny bit for a piece like this.

In the end, you know what ultimately worked the best?

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Yeah, a hacksaw. Go figure.

Anyways, here you can see my mangled I/O plate for the motherboard. It's not a pretty sight at all in my opinion.

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This is the nice I/O plate that I didn't even have to do anything except drill out a few rivets.

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I think I'm going to have to come up with a better solution for this. We'll see shortly ;)

Hope everyone who is getting snow is enjoying it, I know here in Ottawa, it's been a pretty crazy few days!

Stay tuned for more updates, will be spending some time in the shop this week and working with WOOD!

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More Drawer Work

Postby ultimatedesk » Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:12 pm

I had a bit of time in the shop this week to work on getting my drawers up to speed. I decided to take the advice of a fellow forum member and add "false fronts" to my drawers so that I can attach the "real fronts" using screws by screwing from the inside of the drawer, so I wouldn't have any screw heads to cover up on the outside.

Here they are, with my roughed out false fronts - I happened to have 3 pieces of wood almost exactly the size I needed.

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Time to take out 'ol trusty

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A quick test fit, and all 3 fit perfectly

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Add a bit of glue, and some trusty clamps, and we've got ourselves the beginnings of some false fronts!

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All 3 of them fit rather nicely. I think they helped square out the drawers overall as well (Even though they were only out of square by around 1/16th of an inch).

So, I've got some time for the glue to dry. I'm not sure if anyone can remember this, but in my original cut sheets, I had planned on cutting out a specific piece of wood using the wood that I jigsawed out of the desk surface.

Here's that piece:

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Not, exactly.... square..




So I take this nice little protractor attached to a table saw slide - it's set at 90, so here we go!

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I do 2 sides, and then use the actual table saw fence to square out the other 2, but something just doesn't seem right..

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It's not really square. What's going on here?

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Aha! Looks like the protractor was a little bit off, resulting in a shape one step closer to a diamond as opposed to a square. After a bit of readjustment, I redid that bit and cut it to size - it's the drawer face for the large drawer.

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Now that the glue is settled, I decided to throw a few screws into the false fronts.

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Awesome. And solid too!

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Now, this is kind of embarrassing, but I had to go back and fix a mistake I made in my initial cuts. This piece of wood was supposed to be 20" x 28", but it ended up being more like 19.8" x 28". It may not seem like much, but this is the back piece to the left-hand cabinet. I would have to adjust the width of all 3 shelves if I were to continue using this, and I've got the space already pretty tightly packed with computer components on the top shelf.

So... don't do this at home, just cut a new piece of wood (I didn't want to cut into a new sheet of 4x8 just for this one piece...)

This piece looks like a good fit...

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No one will see it, because it'll be in the back, but you will all know. So... let's just forget that ever happened, ok? ;)

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pwcmed
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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby pwcmed » Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:13 pm

You sir, make me feel lazy!

ultimatedesk
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Desk Gluing Time

Postby ultimatedesk » Wed Jan 12, 2011 3:58 pm

Hehehe, sorry pwcmed! Usually I try to inspire people, not deflate them!

I decided it was time to glue the two surfaces together that would comprise of the actual desk surface and take a break from working on the drawers for a while.

Here it is, the first piece. At first I wanted to lay it face down, so I could evenly distribute screws through the bottom, but in the end, I went face up so I would protect the surface, and it would be a LOT easier to line up the holes.

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I threw on the top layer, lined them up, and thought to myself: Hmm, I wonder what it'll look like with the top shelf stacked on:

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Pretty cool. This was the first time I had actually pulled a chair up to it to get a real grasp of how big this desk is going to be. I was pretty psyched.

Just a note, the two pieces of wood on each end holding up the shelf will actually be the inner supports (ie, pushed inwards towards the middle of the desk a foot or two), and the cubby holes on the outer ends will support the long shelf. The long shelf also has to be trimmed a couple inches, it won't reach right to the end of the desk.

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This next part was really quite a challenge on my own.

I lined it up as best as I could (According to the holes that I cut out, since the edges are easy to trim later), lifted one end with a mighty, strong arm, squirted as much glue as I could with my other arm (And only as far as I could reach!), put it down gently, ran to the other side and repeated.

Let me tell you - with the amount of glue I put down, and the fact that each side weighs 20-30 pounds - it did NOT want to slide around easily to get into perfect position.

In the end, I had to muscle it around a bit to get the holes lined up satisfactorily.

(I spoke with a couple friends about this afterward, and one of them suggested making some pilot holes and screwing in a few screws BEFORE the gluing, and then retracting the screws so that just the tips go through the bottom board. That way after the glue is put down, you shuffle around the top board until the tips of the screws find the pilot holes, thus, eliminating the issue of getting proper alignment before the glue becomes too tacky.)

I then threw some weight on top of the table, attached as many clamps as I could find, and started putting some 1.25" screws through the bottom.

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A few clamp shots of the hole - everything lined up pretty much perfect. 1/2" on the left and right, 1/2" at the bottom, and I think just a little under 3/4" at the top. (The size of the lip between the upper and lower holes)

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I wasn't satisfied with the way the clamping was going on lengthwise on the surface. I didn't have enough clamps to place them every half foot, so luckily, Mike had some of these nice, big, cedar logs lying around that I re-purposed temporarily.

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The end result turned out quite nicely. The hole was lined up properly. There is only a small overhang / underhang of maybe 2/16's of an inch on two of the edges of the surfaces that should be easy to correct with a flush-bit on the router later.

We'll take a look at them next update! Thanks for staying tuned!

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Sporg
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Re: Scratch Build: The Ultimate Computer Desk

Postby Sporg » Wed Jan 12, 2011 7:46 pm

I am loving this project, keep those updates coming! On a side note, you may want to add a 56k warning to the subject line for anyone still on dialup.
I would never die for my beliefs because I might be wrong.
~Bertrand Russell

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Drawer Trim

Postby ultimatedesk » Fri Jan 14, 2011 10:41 am

Thanks Sporg, that's a great idea ;)

I got a chance to do some work on the drawer face trim - this was my first time doing solid wood trim.

I cut a nice piece of maple into 1/4" strips, glued, and sanded. I only did one piece this time, as I am not totally sure that this is the way I would like to go.

Something about the trim not meshing quite well with the plywood.

First, I set the table saw to the right width:

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Measure 3 times, and you get a nice solid cut:

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Made a few strips:

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Cut, glued, and clamped on the initial pieces of trim. The trim pieces were about 2/16's of an inch wider than the plywood, which is great, since there will be no voids, though, I'll have to do quite a bit of sanding:

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Took the sander to the top and bottom:

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Overall, it looks pretty good. I'm still not 100% certain about it, however. I'm thinking there is a strong possibility I will go with solid maple for the drawer faces.

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