Vista Premium OEM

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Don Cavanaugh
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Vista Premium OEM

Post by Don Cavanaugh » Wed Feb 07, 2007 12:16 pm

Greetings All,
My question is in regards to installing Windows Vista Premium OEM
I am just getting the final pieces together to put a machine together for myself.
I went ahead and bought Vista since it is the latest from Microsoft.

I am wondering if I will have any issues with running office 2003 and if the OEM portion of the licensing will come back to bite me when I go to register the system
Thanks,

Don

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werty316
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Post by werty316 » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:20 pm

You first mistake will be buying Vista and you second mistake is buying an OEM version.

OEM is bad as you can only install it on one machine so once you activate it you cannot install it on another computer, even if you upgrade.
There is no theory of evolution. Just a list of animals Chuck Norris allows to live.

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The Black Pumpkin
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Post by The Black Pumpkin » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:32 pm

Well, you can, just not legally. :roll:
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werty316
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Post by werty316 » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:38 pm

Well yeah but I didn't want to mention anything about it ;)
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The Black Pumpkin
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Post by The Black Pumpkin » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:39 pm

Yeah, I for one don't recommend it, since it's illegal and all that jazz. :P

It's an option, just an extremely frowned upon one. 8)
AMD Opteron 1224SE "Santa Ana" = DFI Lanparty UT NF590 SLI-M2R/G
Crucial Ballistix 4x1GB DDR2 800 = Corsair CMPSU-750TX
Sapphire 4870 1GB = Sceptre X20WG-Naga 20" = Logitech X-530 5.1
Seagate 320GB (SATA II) x2 = Samsung SH-S203B (SATA)

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The Black Pumpkin
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Post by The Black Pumpkin » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:41 pm

And if someone does do that stuff, they shouldn't say on a public forum. :P

Microsoft will hear you...
AMD Opteron 1224SE "Santa Ana" = DFI Lanparty UT NF590 SLI-M2R/G
Crucial Ballistix 4x1GB DDR2 800 = Corsair CMPSU-750TX
Sapphire 4870 1GB = Sceptre X20WG-Naga 20" = Logitech X-530 5.1
Seagate 320GB (SATA II) x2 = Samsung SH-S203B (SATA)

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Post by KnightRid » Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:14 am

OEM is fine as long as you will be buying another copy of Vista if you upgrade your computer to a new one in the future.

If you want to be able to reinstall Vista wherever and whenever you want, you should get the Retail!

OEM is supposed to be BOUND to the hardware. I have heard and read that changing a motherboard makes it a new comptuer and you have to buy Vista again!

Mike
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Remember, I am opinionated and nothing I say or do reflects on anyone or anything else but me :finga:

Don Cavanaugh
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Post by Don Cavanaugh » Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:15 am

Thanks for your input...perhaps I should wait and install XP pro on the new machine I am putting together?

Your suggestions?

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Post by rocktrout » Thu Feb 08, 2007 9:26 am

Don Cavanaugh wrote:Thanks for your input...perhaps I should wait and install XP pro on the new machine I am putting together?

Your suggestions?
Don, Have you consider setting up a dual boot for Vista and XP? I think I'm going to go that route with my new computer. My laptop is running Vista and I have some software related issues that is holding me back from going full bore on my new system.

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Post by KnightRid » Thu Feb 08, 2007 10:58 am

Don Cavanaugh wrote:Thanks for your input...perhaps I should wait and install XP pro on the new machine I am putting together?

Your suggestions?
honestly the only thing would be if you are going to want to install that Vista on another computer at some point in time.

If not go with the dual boot suggestion till you make sure everything works properly.

Mike
Cigar Blog I review for - http://www.stogiereview.com

Remember, I am opinionated and nothing I say or do reflects on anyone or anything else but me :finga:

Don Cavanaugh
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Post by Don Cavanaugh » Fri Feb 09, 2007 8:24 am

Thanks...
Excellent idea...I will be going with the dual boot

:drinkers:

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Vista does not sound good to me.

Post by rsrch » Mon Feb 12, 2007 10:58 am

Vista gives a view of a new world
Internet law professor Michael Geist casts an eye over the fine print in Windows Vista and is concerned at what he finds.

Vista, the latest version of Microsoft Windows has made its long awaited consumer debut. It incorporates a new, sleek look and such novelties as better search tools and stronger security.

Early reviews have tended to damn the upgrade with faint praise, however, characterising it as the best, most secure version of Windows, yet one that contains few, if any, revolutionary features.

While those reviews have focused chiefly on new functions, for the past few months the legal and technical communities have dug into Vista's "fine print".

Those communities have raised red flags about Vista's legal terms and conditions as well as the technical limitations built in to the software at the insistence of the motion picture industry.

Hard look

The net effect of these concerns may constitute the real Vista revolution as they point to an unprecedented loss of consumer control over their own PCs.

In the name of shielding consumers from computer viruses and protecting copyright owners from potential infringement, Vista seemingly wrestles control of the "user experience" from the user.

Vista's legal fine print includes extensive provisions granting Microsoft the right to regularly check the legitimacy of the software and holds the prospect of deleting certain programs without the user's knowledge.

During the installation process, users "activate" Vista by associating it with a particular computer or device and transmitting certain hardware information directly to Microsoft.

Even after installation, the legal agreement grants Microsoft the right to revalidate the software or to require users to reactivate it should they make changes to their computer components.

For those users frustrated by the software's limitations, Microsoft cautions that "you may not work around any technical limitations in the software".


Michael Geist
In addition, it sets significant limits on the ability to copy or transfer the software, prohibiting anything more than a single backup copy and setting strict limits on transferring the software to different devices or users.

Vista also incorporates Windows Defender, a security program that actively scans computers for "spyware, adware, and other potentially unwanted software". The agreement does not define any of these terms, leaving it to Microsoft to determine what constitutes unwanted software.

Once operational, the agreement warns that Windows Defender will, by default, automatically remove software rated "high" or "severe" even though that may result in other software ceasing to work or mistakenly result in the removal of software that is not unwanted.

For greater certainty, the terms and conditions remove any doubt about who is in control by providing that "this agreement only gives you some rights to use the software. Microsoft reserves all other rights".

For those users frustrated by the software's limitations, Microsoft cautions that "you may not work around any technical limitations in the software".

Those technical limitations have proven to be even more controversial than the legal ones.

Image problem

In December 2006, Peter Gutmann, a computer scientist at the University of Auckland in New Zealand released a paper called "A Cost Analysis of Windows Vista Content Protection".

The paper pieced together the technical fine print behind Vista, unraveling numerous limitations in the new software seemingly installed at the direct request of Hollywood.

Mr Gutmann focused primarily on the restrictions associated with the ability to play high-definition content from the next-generation Blu-Ray and HD-DVD discs (referred to as "premium content"). He noted that Vista intentionally degrades the picture quality of premium content when played on most computer monitors.

Mr Gutmann's research suggests that consumers will pay more for less with poorer picture quality yet higher costs since Microsoft needed to obtain licenses from third parties in order to access the technology that protects premium content (those license fees were presumably incorporated into Vista's price).

Moreover, he calculated that the technological controls would require considerable consumption of computing power with the system conducting 30 checks each second to ensure that there are no attacks on the security of the premium content.

Microsoft responded to Mr Gutmann's paper earlier this month, maintaining that content owners demanded the premium content restrictions.

Said Microsoft: "If the policies [associated with the premium content] required protections that Windows Vista couldn't support, then the content would not be able to play at all on Windows Vista PCs."

While that may be true, left unsaid is Microsoft's ability to demand a better deal on behalf of its enormous user base or the prospect that users could opt-out of the technical controls.

When Microsoft introduced Windows 95 more than a decade ago, it adopted the Rolling Stones Start Me Up as its theme song. As millions of consumers contemplate the company's latest upgrade, the legal and technological restrictions may leave them singing You Can't Always Get What You Want.

Michael Geist holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/t ... 319845.stm

Published: 2007/02/01 09:57:06 GMT

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