The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Hard Drives, Optical Drives, USB keys, Flash memory. Need help with or have experiences with a storage device? Share it in here!
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The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by skier » Sun Aug 03, 2008 12:24 pm

comment, awe, suggest, help, sticky, correct, whatever, thought it would be REALLY cool to have one of these for almost every sub-forum 8)

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1950s: magnetic drums were the first mechanical “direct access” storage device.
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1951: Magnetic Tapes, Their tape was made of metal, but later tapes have been made mostly of plastic.
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1956: IBM: the 305 RAMAC (Random Access Method of Accounting and Control). This system could store five MBytes. It had fifty, 24-inch diameter disks!
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1958: laserdisk technology was developed by David Paul Gregg in the form of a transparent disk (this technology was the predecessor to the CD)
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1961: First use of zoned recording: Bryant Computer 4240 – 90 Megabytes, twenty four 39" disks
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1961: IBM had invented the first disk drive with air bearing heads: IBM 1301 "Advanced Disk File" – 28 Megabytes, twenty five 24" disks
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1963: First 14" disk drive and first with removable disk pack: IBM 1311 "Low Cost File" – 2.69 Megabytes, six 14" disks
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1965: First voice coil actuator, first single disk cartridge drive: IBM 2310 "Ramkit" – 1.024 Megabytes, one 14" disk
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1966: First disk drive with ferrite core heads: IBM 2314 -- 29.17 Megabytes, eleven 14" disks
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1967: The IBM 1360 was the world’s first device capable of storing 1 trillion bits. An electron beam wrote information onto small plastic strips that were then stored in a robotic retrieval system
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1969: the eight inch floppy disk drive was introduced by IBM
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1969: Philips developed the Laser disk in reflective mode, which worked much better than it's transparent counter-part
Image{pic compares CD(right) to LD(left)}

1970: DEC Hard Drive Assembly
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1971: First track-following servo system: IBM 3330-1 "Merlin" – 100 Megabytes, eleven 14" disks
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1971: First flexible disk drive, read-only: IBM 23FD "Minnow" -- .0816 Megabytes, one 8" disk
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1973: IBM shipped the model 3340 Winchester,The 3340 had two spindles each with a capacity of 30 MBytes
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1973: First flexible disk drive to set industry standard for 8 inch diskettes: IBM 33FD "Igar" -- .156 Megabytes, one 8" disk
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1975: Tape Drive(Recorder) IBM 5106 Tape Drive
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1975: First disk drive with rotary actuator: IBM 62 GV "Gulliver" – 5 or 9 Megabytes, one 14" disk
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1976: First 5.25 inch flexible disk drive: Shugart Associates SA400 -- .2188 Megabytes, one 5.25" disk
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1976: Re-introduction of disk drive with fixed disk media: IBM 3350 "Madrid" -- 317.5 Megabytes, eight 14" disks
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1976: First flexible disk drive with two sided recording: IBM 43FD "Crystal" -- .568 Megabytes, one 8" disk
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1978: the StorageTek company developed the first solid-state drive.
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1978: The reflective Laserdisk was finally released, Philips produced the LD players, and MCA made the disks
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1979: First disk drive with thin film heads, and 2,7 encoding: IBM 3370 "New File Project" – 571.4 Megabytes, seven 14" disks
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1979: First 8 inch rigid disk drive: IBM 62PC "Piccolo" – 64.5 Megabytes, six 8" disks
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1980: The world's first gigabyte-capacity disk drive, the IBM 3380 was introduced, weighing 550 pounds
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1980: Seagate Technology introduced the first hard disk drive for microcomputers, the ST506, It was a full height (twice as high as most current 5 1/4" drives) 5 1/4" drive, with a stepper motor, and held 5 Mbytes
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1981: First 10.5 inch rigid disk drive: Fujitsu F6421 "Eagle" – 446 Megabytes, six 10.5" disks
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1981: First 3.5 inch flexible disk drive: Sony OA-D3OV -- .4375 Megabytes, one 3.5" disk
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1982: Morrow Designs creates the 20MB Hard Disk Drive
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1982: First 9 inch rigid disk drive: Control Data 9715-160 "FSD" – 150 Megabytes, six 9" disks

1982: Apple's III External Floppy Drive(5 1/2)
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1983: Philips and Sony, in consortium, successfully developed the compact disc
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1983: Rodime made the first 3.5 inch rigid disk drive: RO 352 – 10 Megabytes, two 3.5" disks
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1983: First 8 disk 5.25 inch disk drive, with in-hub motor: Maxtor XT-1140 – 126 Megabytes, eight 5.25" disks
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1983: Iomega released the Bernoulli Box which takes high capacity Bernoulli disks( >20MB). It was the predecessor to Zip Drives
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1984: Sun Microsystems released a Network File System which allowed network servers to share their storage space with networked clients
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1984: The first CD-ROM drives were shipped
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1984: First 8.8 inch rigid disk drive: Hitachi DK815-5 – 460 Megabytes, eight 8.8" disk

1985: The 3 1/2" IDE drive started its existence as a drive on a plug-in expansion board, or "hard card." The hard card included the drive on the controller which, in turn, evolved into Integrated Device Electronics (IDE) hard disk drive, where the controller became incorporated into the printed circuit on the bottom of the hard disk drive: Quantum Hardcard – 10.5 Megabytes, one 3.5" disk
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1986: the first 3 /12" hard disks with voice coil actuators were introduced by Conner in volume, but half (1.6") and full height 5 1/4" drives persisted for several years: Conner Peripherals CP340 – 40 Megabytes, two 3.5" disks
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1986: Standardization of SCSI, most commonly used on early Macs for external Hard Drives because macs did not have internal HDD bays
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1987: HP Prototype DDS-1 Tape Drive
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1988: Conner introduced the first one inch high 3 1/2" hard disk drives: Conner Peripherals CP3022 – 21 Megabytes, one 3.5" disk
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1988: PrairieTek shipped the first 2 1/2" hard disks: PrairieTek 220 – 20 Megabytes, two 2.5" disks
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1988: First 9.5 inch rigid disk drive: Hitachi DKU-86i – 1,890 Megabytes, eight 9.5" disks
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1989 - Jimmy Zhu and H. Neal Bertram from UCSD proposed exchange decoupled granular microstructure for thin film disk storage media, still used today.

1989: Apple 3.5 Floppy drive
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1990: PRML Technology introduced (Digital Read Channel with 'Partial Response Maximum Likelihood' algorithm) IBM 0681 "Redwing" – 857 Megabytes, twelve 5.25" disks
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1991: 2.5-inch 100 megabyte hard drive

1991: First disk drive using magnetoresistive heads: IBM 0663 "Corsair" – 1,004 Megabytes, eight 3.5" disks
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1991: First 1.8 inch disk drive: Integral Peripherals 1820 "Mustang" – 21.4 Megabytes, one 1.8" disk
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1992: First 1.8 inch PC Card disk drives: Integral Peripherals 1841PA "Ranger" – 42.5 Megabytes, one 1.8" disk

1992: first 1.3-inch hard disk drive: Hewlett-Packard C3013A "Kittyhawk" – 21.4 Megabytes, two 1.3" disks
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1993: Seagate introduced the first 7,200 RPM, Ultra ATA hard disk drive for desktop computers: ST12550 "Barracuda" – 2,139 Megabytes, ten 3.5" disks
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1993: First 6.5" rigid disk drive: Hitachi H-6588-314 – 2,920 Megabytes, eight 6.5" disks

1994: IBM introduces Laser Textured Landing Zones (LZT)
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1994: Sandisk releases Compactflash cards
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1995: First embedded servo flexible disk drive: Zip Drives were developed in 100MB sizes, later followed by 250 and 750MB: Iomega Zip 100
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1995: First 3 inch rigid disk drive: JTS N0640-2AR – 641.7 Megabytes, two 3" disks

1995: The Quantum Fireball 1.2GB HDD
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1995: Philips External CD-ROM Drive
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1995: the DVD was created which could be written up to 4.7GB
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1995: M-Systems introduced flash-based solid-state drives
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1995: Apple introduced Firewire to replace Parallel SCSI as serial SCSI eventually did, Firewire had improvements in 2000, 2002, 2006, and will in 2008
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* 1994 DMA, Mode 2 at 16.6MB/s
* 1997 Ultra ATA/33 at 33.3MB/s
* 1999 Ultra ATA/66 at 66.6MB/s
* 2000 Ultra ATA/100 at 100MB/s
* 2003 PATA/133 at 133MB/s
* 2003 Serial ATA 1.5 at 150MB/s
* 2005 Serial ATA 3.0 at 300MB/s
* 2009 Serial ATA 6.0 at 600MB/s

1996: IBM introduces GMR (Giant MR) Technology for read sensors
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1997: First drive using giant magnetoresistive heads: IBM Deskstar 16GP "Titan" – 16,800 Megabytes, five 3.5" disks
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1997: First 10,000 RPM disk drive: Seagate Technology ST19101 "Cheetah 9" – 9,100 Megabytes, eight 3.5" disks
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1998 - UltraDMA/33 and ATAPI standardized
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1998: First 10,000 RPM drive with 3 inch disks: Seagate Technology ST118202 "Cheetah 18" – 18,200 Megabytes, twelve 3" disks
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1998: First 12,000 RPM disk drive: Hitachi DK3E1T-91 – 9,200 Megabytes, nine 2.5" disks

1999: IBM releases the Microdrive in 170 MB and 340 MB capacities.
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2000: the first SD (Secure Digital) card was produced jointly by Sandisk, Toshiba and Panasonic
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2000: Trek Technology and IBM began selling the first USB flash drives commercially(8MB)
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2000: Seagate unveils the first 15,000 RPM HDD: Seagate Technology ST318451 "Cheetah X15" – 18,350 Megabytes, three 2.5" disks
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2001: talk of Holographic data storage, which is said to be capable of recording and reading millions of bits in parallel, enabling data transfer rates greater than those attained by optical storage.
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2002: 137 GB addressing space barrier broken

2003: CeBIT: Sandisk released MiniSD cards in 16MB size
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2003: Serial ATA introduced
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April 2003: Blu-Ray became commercially available, though only in Japan with single Layer Disks of size 25GB, and Dual Layer 50GB disks available
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2004: eSATA, External SATA became standardized
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2005: Introduction of faster SAS (Serial Attached SCSI)
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2005: First 500 GB hard drive shipping (Hitachi GST)
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2005: InPhase conducts the first public demonstrations of holographic storage at the National Association of Broadcasters convention
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2005: Serial ATA 3G standardized
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2005: Perpendicular recording introduced in consumer HDDs
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2005: First .85" disk Drive: Toshiba
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2005: the i-RAM is a solid-state drive produced by Gigabyte which has four DIMM slots to allow PC DDR RAM to be used to store data.
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2005: at CeBit, IBM introduces Millipede memory, non-volatile computer memory stored on nanoscopic pits burned into the surface of a thin polymer layer, read and written by a MEMS-based probe, can hold more than 1 terabit per square inch.
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2006: First 200 GB 2.5" hard drive utilizing Perpendicular recording (Toshiba)
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2006: First 750 GB hard drive
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2006: MicroSD cards introduced, primarily used in cell phones, in up to 2GB capacities
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2006: BD-ROM(Blu-Ray Disks) had become available in the US following DRM protection and Specification finalizations
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2006: hybrid Disk Drives are designed
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2006: Fujitsu develops heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) that could one day achieve one terabit per square inch densities.
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December 11, 2006: Advanced Media, Inc. is set to add a non-volatile Flash Solid State Disk (SSD) storage medium to its RIDATA line. It is available in 16 GB and 32GB capacities.
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2007:Hybrid Disk Drives are released by Samsung for Notebook Computers
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2007: Hitachi GST introduces 1 terabyte hard drive
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January 2007: A-DATA introduced at the Las Vegas CES 2007 (January 2007) SSD drives at capacities of 32 GB, 64 GB (1.8" model) and 128 GB (2.5" model)
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2007: Hard Drive Docks were Produced for internal Hard Drives made external, using the USB or eSATA interface
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January 2008: CompactFlash cards reach 64GB in size
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February 2008: the High Definition Media War is over: Blu-Ray had won
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2008: USB Flash Drives now also reach the size of 64GB
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2008: Micro SD cards Reach 12GB capacities
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May 2008: SSD's size reaches 256GB: Samsung announces increase in capacity of its flash-based SSD line to 256 GB
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2008: Seagate announced the first 1.5 terabyte hard drive
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2008: Micron Introduces RealSSD's, a performance increased SSD
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Sep 2008: Intel launches the fastest SSD(or hard drive for that matter) in existance, the 80 & 160 GB Intel X25M SSD using intel's own controller and NAND flash memory
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2008?: Addonics releases a CF - SATA HDD Adapter, to make up to two Compact Flash cards (possibly in RAID) act as a Solid State Drive(though slightly slower, but much cheaper)
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Jan 27th, 2009: Western Digital Announces the world's largest capacity HDD to date, holding 2TB, as part of their "Cool and Quiet, Caviar Green" series with a 5400RPM spindle speed
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Feb 4th 2009: Seagate intros the 7,200rpm 2TB Constellation ES, first 2TB Drive to run at 7200RPM
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April 8th 2009: Super Talent Announces the first 512GB 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive
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April 17 2009: OCZ Technology Introduces MiniPCI–Express Solid State Drives
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April 23 2009: OCZ Technology Announces the Z-Drive PCI-Express SSD for Enthusiasts with up to One Terabyte of Storage
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June 5th 2009: A-DATA unveils the world's slimmest Portable Hard Disk Drive, the NH92
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June 9th 2009: WD Intros first 4TB External Hard Drive, the My Book Studio Edition Dual-drive External Storage System
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June 29 2009: Super Talent Ships New Line of Flash Disk Modules That incorporate a standard IDE hard drive interface and use solid state NAND flash as the storage media, 8, 16 32GB
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July 14th 2009: Seagate Releases Cheetah 15K.7 Enterprise Hard Drives in record 600GB capacity
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July 21st 2009: Intel Delivers Industry's First 34-Nanometer NAND Flash Solid-State Drives, The Intel X25-M
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July 22nd 2009: A-DATA Announces Turbo Series SDHC Class 10 Memory Card
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July 27th 2009: Western Digital Ships First 1TB Mobile Hard Drive, the WD Scorpio Blue 1 TB (model WD10TEVT)
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July 29th 2009: Samsung Launches The Spinpoint F3 which utilizes advanced 500GB per platter technology, so that two-platter 1TB capacity is achieved.
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http://www.legitreviews.com
http://www.disktrend.com/5decades2.htm
http://www.Wikipedia.org
http://www.computerhistory.org/virtualv ... /home.html
http://www.duxcw.com/digest/guides/hd/hd2.htm
http://www.addonics.com/products/flash_ ... sahdcf.asp
Last edited by skier on Thu Aug 06, 2009 9:53 pm, edited 17 times in total.
-Austin
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by Alathald » Sun Aug 03, 2008 1:26 pm

And the old drives that either burn out or drop out all join together to form a cover band with other ancient equipment :mrgreen: [link]

Awesome writeup and a great idea btw! :drinkers:
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by martini161 » Sun Aug 03, 2008 8:33 pm

good write up! you should have some stuff on firewire in there.

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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by skier » Sun Aug 03, 2008 10:30 pm

martini161 wrote:good write up! you should have some stuff on firewire in there.
actually, i have no external Hard Drives! too late tonight, so tomorrow i'll add 'em(if i can find rough release dates )

and thanks, and if anyone has some spare time they can make one of these for other components(RAM, Intel CPUs/Mobos, AMD CPUs/Mobos, etc.)

the main part took about 4 hours, and it took two hours to figure out what [img] wasn't allowing me to post because PHPBB "could not determine the size of the image" because 1 was a link to a site not just a pic, and another two were too large :roll:
-Austin
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by ScottLovesDogs » Mon Aug 04, 2008 6:19 am

There are at least two inaccuracies here:

IBM did not "develop" the 5 1/2" floppy, Shugart did, after a famous meeting between two of their employees and An Wang, at which Wang (Wang Computers) complained about the unwieldly size of the 8" floppy (which was developed by IBM).

Second, the first 15,000 rpm drive was not released in 2008, it was some time ago. It was a Seagate Cheetah, though. The 15K.5, in Seagate nomenclature, means 15K rpm, 5th generation. The original 15K series, or whatever they called it back then, was the first 15,000 rpm drive, and it was available several years ago. Seagate is now on the 6th generation of these drives, the 15K.6.

The original post is a great start on a valuable and interesting topic that would make a great stickie or sticky. A bit of clean up /verification work would make it outstanding.
Last edited by ScottLovesDogs on Mon Aug 04, 2008 1:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by DMB2000uk » Mon Aug 04, 2008 6:56 am

ScottLovesDogs wrote:There are at least two inaccuracies here:

IBM did not "develop" the 5 1/2" floppy, Shugart did, after a famous meeting between two of their employees and An Wang, at which Wang (Wang Computers) complained about the unwieldly size of the 8" floppy (which was developed by IBM).

Second, the first 15,000 rpm drive was not released in 2008, it was some time ago. It was a Seagate Cheetah, though. The 15K.5, in Seagate nomenclature, means 15K rpm, 5th generation. The original 15K series, or whatever they called it back then, was the first 15,000 rpm drive, and it was available several years ago. Seagate is now on the 6th generation of these drives, the 15K.6.

The original post is a great start on a valuable and interesting topic that would make a great stickie or sticky. A bit of clean up /verification work would make it outstanding.
Think of this as more of a community effort than one man's attempt at getting it all right first time.

I commend Skierkids efforts, and in the 4hours he sourced and compiled all that information I'm sure we can let him off with some initial mistakes.

If you (or anyone reading) can expand on Skierkid's 'brief' history then please do.

Dan
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by pwcmed » Mon Aug 04, 2008 9:48 am

I actually worked on something that is very similar to the 1980 drive about 8 years ago.

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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by martini161 » Mon Aug 04, 2008 10:25 am

when i was on vacation my wife and i went into an antique shop and i couldnt help my self when i saw an old apple quadra 700. the funniest part was that the lady said "Oh its not that old!" :mrgreen: its from 1991 :rolleyes:

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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by skier » Mon Aug 04, 2008 3:51 pm

major update :shock: tons more pics, several fixed pics(pic of wrong things) more entries, ALL pics now are hosted not stolen

still have to look it over and fix a couple more innacurate pics :?
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by skier » Mon Aug 04, 2008 5:20 pm

ten more pics to 85, and external/HDD docks coming soon
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by FZ1 » Mon Aug 04, 2008 5:48 pm

Good job skierkid. You might want to use this for a school report sometime in the future :)
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by skier » Tue Aug 05, 2008 11:44 am

updated: SD, MiniSD, Micro SD, Firewire, HDD Dock, and eSATA

edit: also updated picture sizes to accomodate 1024x768 monitors(there is still one picture a few pixels too wide, but it looses some of the image when resized)
-Austin
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by w00fd06 » Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:32 pm

looks good so far!! It will be interesting if this idea is expanded and becomes a part of this site, I wish you luck on your journey! :mrgreen:

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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by vicaphit » Mon Aug 11, 2008 5:21 pm

I always enjoy seeing the evolution of the computer. You did very well!

HAH! 1GB that weighs 550lbs...
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by Alathald » Mon Aug 11, 2008 6:20 pm

vicaphit wrote:HAH! 1GB that weighs 550lbs...
Yeah, pretty wild considering I just gave away a flash drive about that size with DSL to a friend whose laptop HD crapped out...and I'm a cheap bastard that never gives anything away :shock:
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by Dragon_Cooler » Sun Sep 14, 2008 8:59 am

It is pretty amazing how far we have come! Two things that i look back on...

1. Spending $60 on a 20GB drive at bestbuy in early 00
2. The next day finding a new 80GB drive for the same price and being ecstatic!!!

man oh man, oh how the days just fly by!
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by kappage » Tue Sep 16, 2008 5:38 am

my oldman always remind me of in 1988 or 1989 his friend bought some ridiculously small hard drive for like $500 AUD (back then it was alot of money) i think he still has it too.
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by vicaphit » Tue Sep 16, 2008 8:21 pm

Take a look at ram, I was talking to an IT guy who said ram used to be $1000 per MB!
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Andy

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skier
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by skier » Thu Oct 09, 2008 10:04 am

has there been any new stuff coming out in storage? i havnt been paying close attention here
-Austin
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DMB2000uk
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Re: The History of Storage[56K ALERT]

Post by DMB2000uk » Thu Oct 09, 2008 10:28 am

Intel X25M SSD should probably get a mention.

Dan
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